2021 – Busy Successful Year

Hope for Congo wants to say, THANK YOU, for your faithfulness and support. You have given to this ministry. You have prayed for us. Your faithfulness to God allowed us to be your hands and feet in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Jehovah Jireh, God provides, expresses well this past year of 2021. This feels like an understatement when we reflect back. God has supplied above and beyond what we could ask for or imagine.

 

Completed six primary school classrooms
and an administrative office.

 

 

Successfully drilled a well at Ndjoko Punda.

The team located a 135 foot deep reservoir of water . . .beyond expectations.

 

 

 

Began construction to replace the hospital at Ndjoko Punda.

The old hospital was destroyed by a storm in 2019.

 

 

500 Bibles distributed.

300 of those Bibles were distributed

to pastors with no Bible.

 

Sometimes it seems things move so slowly, especially has we remember months of waiting for various parts of these projects to come together. However, we must remember, God is at work even when we do not see it. If we do not give up, in time we will reap a harvest.

Thank you for the privilege of being your hands and feet serving the people of the DRC. Together, we are sharing in this harvest.

© 2021 Hope4Congo. All Rights Reserved.

April 1, 2020

School Project

Prior to the coronavirus (COVID-19) quarantine and related restrictions, we were able to accomplish some work on the school building project.

Building materials were shipped and received. Thank goodness we avoided the price increases currently experienced in the country.

It began with the arrival of bricks.

 

 

 

 

With a little help, the building began to take shape.

 

 

 

 

 

The roof framework is up.

 

 

 

 

The roof is almost done. More work to do.

However . . .


All our Hope4Congo projects are currently on hold.

Current Stats on Coronavirus

As of this day’s blogpost (April 1, 2020), Democratic Republic of the Congo reported 109 confirmed cases and 9 deaths. To check updates for yourself through the World Health Organization’s website, go to this link and click on the country/area of the world to see their latest statistics:
https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/685d0ace521648f8a5beeeee1b9125cd


Website Change

On a far less crucial topic, we plan to update our website. We hope to make it easier to navigate. Hopefully you’ll see positive changes in the next few weeks.


Prayer

• Praise that shipping materials arrived for the school building prior to the quarantine.
• Praise also that the drilling equipment (LINK) arrived safely at Ndjoko Punda.
• Please continue to pray for the people of Congo.
• Thank you for your prayers for us as we seek to update our website.

© 2020 Hope4Congo







A School for Ndjoko Punda

Matthew 9:35-38 Then Jesus made a circuit of all the towns and villages. He taught in their meeting places, reported kingdom news, and healed their diseased bodies, healed their bruised and hurt lives. When he looked out over the crowds, his heart broke. So confused and aimless they were, like sheep with no shepherd. “What a huge harvest!” He said to his disciples. “How few workers! On your knees and pray for harvest hands!” (The Message)

Ndjoko Punda School circa 1960

Before the harvest can occur, the farmer must first turn over the ground, prepare the soil, plant the seed, and water it.

Wherever the Gospel was taken, this same type of process occurred before the spiritual harvest happened. Missions brought medical aide, education, agriculture, and industry. Missionaries sought to improve relationships and the overall quality of life in the communities they served.

Ministry to the whole body, mind, and soul . . .
Resulted in schools, hospitals, print shops, bookstores, etc.

History reveals this pattern of ministry to be true for many mission efforts around the world. It is seen throughout all of Africa wherever the Gospel was taken.

Ministry to the whole body, mind, and soul is still relevant today. The youth of the Democratic Republic of Congo are the leaders of tomorrow.

For the children at Ndjoko Punda, school is the opportunity of a lifetime.

Problems Prevent Children from an Education:
-Children are needed at home to help the family
-Lack of money to travel for school
-Lack of educational resources
-Lack of nearby classrooms

For several years Hope for Congo has been waiting for the right opportunity and time to build a set of primary classroom buildings at Ndjoko Punda. The time and opportunity has arrived now. “Seed” money has been provided for us to build the first building, which will provide three classrooms.

Only a few buildings remain of the original school complex which once existed. They are in ruins as the attached photographs reveal. They were destroyed by age, neglect due to lack of resources, and damage from periodic storms. This building project will replace the old school buildings.

The complete building plan calls for a total of four buildings in the complex. Two buildings with three classrooms each, one administrative office, and separate lavatories for both boys and girls.

The total project is estimated to cost $56,000. More money is needed to construct all the buildings and to furnish the classrooms and administrative offices. Your prayers and tax-deductible donations can help make this possible. 

Mail your U.S. Dollar Donations to:
Africa Inter-Mennonite Mission (AIMM)
P.O. Box 744
Goshen, IN 46527-0744

Mail your Canadian Dollar Donations to:
Africa Inter-Mennonite Mission (AIMM)
440 Main Street
Steinbach, MB R5G 1Z5

© 2018 Hope4Congo

School and Pets

IMG_1775
Stan (Kanyinda) and Bonnie with two of their precious grandchildren

We continue our interview with Stan about his childhood in Congo. Kanyinda, what was school like?

“Another missionary who lived on our station home schooled us for our early grades. In fourth grade I went to the missionary children’s boarding school. It was a two-day trip by car to that school. That first year I was very lonely, missing my parents, but then I made friends. In addition to school we had a great deal of freedom, we went hiking, etc. Although we had school work to do and cared for our rooms. I guess I had so much fun in my daily life that I didn’t realize I was doing chores.”

Children reading this may become jealous of your childhood, Stan. What kind of pets did you have in Congo?

“We had several parrots, a squirrel and a few monkeys. The Congolese would often bring birds to sell us for pets. They still sell them for pets or for food. Even small birds are eaten. They use a very sticky sap that they spread on tree branches to catch the birds.

“When we were in Africa this last time someone wanted to sell me a young Civet Cat for a pet. It was kind of a cute little thing with the black and white rings on its tail and its long snout. But of course, I couldn’t bring it back to America with me.”

Next week Brad will tell us what it was like to return to Congo in 2007 after an absence of many years.

©2015 Hope4Congo